Inside Facebook’s Early Days | The Facebook Dilemma |  FRONTLINE
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Inside Facebook’s Early Days | The Facebook Dilemma | FRONTLINE


>>Are we good?>>Should I put the beer down?>>Nah, no, actually, I’m gonna mention the beer. (laughing)>>Hard at work.>>So I’m here in Palo Alto, California, chilling with Mark Zuckerberg of the Facebook.com, and we’re drinking out of a keg of Heineken because… what are we celebrating, Mark?>>We just got three million users.>>11, 12, 13…>>Whoo!>>Tell us, you know, simply what Facebook is.>>I think Facebook is an online directory for colleges. I realized that because I didn’t have people’s information, I needed to make it interesting enough so that people would want to use the site and want to, like, put their information up. So we launched it at Harvard, and within a couple of weeks, two-thirds of the school had signed up. So we’re, like, “All right, this is pretty sweet, like, let’s just go all out.” I mean, it’s just interesting seeing how it evolves. We have a sweet office.>>Yeah, well, show us… show us around the crib. (talking in background) We didn’t want cubicles, so we got IKEA kitchen tables instead. I thought that kind of went along with our whole vibe here.>>Uh-huh. What’s in your fridge?>>Some stuff. There’s some beer down there.>>How many people work for you?>>It’s actually 20 right now.>>Did you get this shot, this one here, the lady riding a pit bull?>>Oh, nice.>>All right, it’s really all I’ve got.>>That’s cool.>>Where are you taking Facebook at this point in your life?>>Um, I mean… there doesn’t necessarily have to be more. ♪ ♪>>From the early days, Mark had this vision of connecting the whole world. So if Google was about providing you access to all the information, Facebook was about connecting all the people.>>Can you just say your name and pronounce it so nobody messes it up and they have it on tape?>>Sure, it’s Mark Zuckerberg.>>Great.>>It was not crazy. Somebody was going to connect all those people, why not him?>>We have our Facebook Fellow, we have Mark Zuckerberg.>>I have the pleasure of introducing Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook.com. (applause)>>Yo.>>When Mark Zuckerberg was at Harvard he was fascinated by hacker culture, this notion that software programmers could do things that would shock the world.>>And a lot of times, people are just, like, too careful. I think it’s more useful to, like, make things happen and then, like, apologize later, than it is to make sure that you dot all your I’s now and then, like, just not get stuff done.>>So it was a little bit of a renegade philosophy and a disrespect for authority that led to the Facebook motto “Move fast and break things.”>>Never heard of Facebook? (laughing)>>Our school went crazy for the Facebook.>>It creates its own world that you get sucked into.>>We started adding things like status updates and photos and groups and apps. When we first launched, we were hoping for, you know, maybe 400, 500 people. (cheering)>>Toast to the first 100 million, and the next 100 million.>>Cool.>>So you’re motivated by what?>>Building things that, you know, change the world in a way that it needs to be changed.>>Who is Barack Obama? The answer is right there on my Facebook page.>>Mr. Zuckerberg…>>’Sup, Zuck?>>In those days, “move fast and break things” didn’t seem to be sociopathic.>>If you’re building a product that people love, you can make a lot of mistakes.>>It wasn’t that they intended to do harm so much as they were unconcerned about the possibility that harm would result.>>So just to be clear, you’re not going to sell or share any of the information on Facebook?>>We’re not gonna share people’s information, except for with the people that they’ve asked for it to be shared.>>Technology optimism was so deeply ingrained in the value system and in the beliefs of people in Silicon Valley…>>We’re here for a hackathon, so let’s get started.>>…that they’d come to believe it is akin to the law of gravity, that of course technology makes the world a better place. It always had, it always will. And that assumption essentially masked a set of changes that were going on in the culture that were very dangerous.

8 thoughts on “Inside Facebook’s Early Days | The Facebook Dilemma | FRONTLINE

  1. Shame on frontline!! I thought frontline was the last vessel of truth! Clearly biased agianst TRUMP!!! Usub, f' the bell!!! Side-bar, YOU, being fortnight (frontnite) a!#!-whipes!! You and I went to university, what I "saw" "frats boy's do was criminal to girls. This vid is just talk frat boys taking big dog, not true!!!

  2. The entitlement, unprofessionalism, juvenile arrogance, manipulating and using people, in a deliberately deceptive- and unregulated – manner, is horrifying. "look around the game. if you can't see the suck…it's you. get up from the table.". Fake.

  3. I am not on and never will be on Facebook. Right from the very beginning anyone that asked me to join I told them, you're just looking for trouble going on a site like that. Too much information is giving up. I seen this from the start . I mean come on how could anyone Trust corporate greed.

    If you agree with me press the thumbs-up on Facebook . LOL SMH

  4. I'm pretty sure Facebook sells information to governments. Everyone who has downloaded their app should know that they access and collect information about all your contacts and even if you don't download their app, your friend who has downloaded it will provide all your personal information that is under their contacts, without them even knowing. Example: I sign up on Facebook with my phone number; my cousin who is not my Facebook friend will appear under the Facebook list: "people you may know", because my cousin saved my phone number on his contacts and downloaded the app. Even if you sign up under a fake name, they will find out your real name when their system matches your phone number with the number saved on someone else's phone. And this face recognition feature, what do you think is for? It's a surveillance machine NOT just for advertisers.

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